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Recent Chelation Studies

Bypass or Chelation?

There are over 7,000 research studies, papers and articles supporting the efficacy of EDTA Chelation Therapy over the past 50 years.

Ca-EDTA has a remarkable wide range of benefitial effects. 

Increasingly, experts believe that the primary benefits of chelation are due to its free radical-fighting effects.1  EDTA chelation functions as a powerful free radical buster — protecting cell membranes, DNA, enzyme systems, and lipoproteins from the destructive effects of these ravenous molecules.  EDTA removes the undesirable toxic heavy metals, free iron molecules, and calcium from the walls of the arteries. 
Perhaps one of the most compelling, but often overlooked, explanations for chelation's anti-aging, energizing effects is that EDTA "resuscitates" your cells' mitochondria. Mitochondria are the "power plants" of every cell in the body — the site in which the energy-producing ATP is generated. Without ATP, life can not exist.2 Loss of mitochondrial function has long been considered to be one of the primary causes of the aging process.3

The first systemic study of EDTA in people with Atherosclerosis was published in 1956. Twenty patients with confirmed heart disease were given a series of 30 EDTA treatments intravenously. Nineteen of the patients experienced improvement, as measured by an increase in physical activity and in another study conducted four years later, a similar group found that three months of EDTA infusions caused decreases in the severity and frequency of anginal episodes, reduced use of nitroglycerin, increased work capacity and improved Electrocardiogram results Since these early studies, hundreds of papers have been published on the favorable effects of chelation therapy in a variety of chronic diseases.

There have been two massive meta analyses of published and unpublished studies evaluating the results of over 24,000 chelation patients. The results: 88 percent of the patients demonstrated clinical improvement.4

One other study included 92 patients who were referred for surgical intervention. At the end of the study, only 10 required surgery either during or after their chelation therapy.5 In another study of 2,870 patients with various degrees of degenerative diseases, especially vascular disease, almost 90% of the patients showed excellent improvement.6 In one small, controlled crossover study of patients with peripheral vascular disease, results showed significant improvements in walking distance and ankle/brachial blood flow.7

And when, in one study, 65 patients on the waiting list for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery (CABG) surgery (for a mean of 6 months) were treated with EDTA chelation therapy — the symptoms in 89% improved so much, they were able to cancel their surgery. In the same study, of 27 patients recommended for limb amputation due to poor peripheral circulation, EDTA chelation resulted in saving 24 limbs.8

It soon became clear from these and later studies that EDTA treatments result in progressive and widespread improvement and stabilization of cardiovascular function. This is in contrast to standard treatments, such as angioplasty or CABG, which instantaneously restore normal function in the few treated arteries, but leave the rest of the body completely untreated (there's every reason to believe that if arteries are clogged in the heart, they're also clogged in other vital organs, like the kidneys and brain). High-tech treatments for heart disease, such as angioplasty and CABG, long hailed as medical breakthroughs, are in fact, oversold, overpriced, and ineffective, especially when compared with EDTA chelation. The truth of this assertion has been demonstrated on numerous occasions over the last 2 decades:

  • The average mortality for CABG surgery is 4% to 10%.9,10 In fact, CABG has no overall effect on improving survival. According to one study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, "As compared with medical therapy, coronary artery bypass surgery appears neither to prolong life nor to prevent myocardial infarction in patients who have mild angina or who are asymptomatic after infarction in the five-year period after coronary angiography."11 By contrast, mortality rates for EDTA chelation, when carried out according to accepted protocols, approaches 0%.12
  • Grafted coronary arteries are more than 10 times as likely to close up again within 3 years compared with coronary arteries that are not replaced with a graft.13 Improved blood flow following EDTA chelation therapy is permanent as long as regular EDTA therapy (either oral or I.V.) is maintained.
  • Significant cerebral dysfunction, especially in older patients, is commonly seen following CABG.14 Because EDTA chelation restores blood flow to the brain, it often results in improved cognition and memory.15
  • Atherosclerosis is typically a body-wide disease. If your coronary arteries are occluded, it's a safe bet that arteries in your brain, kidneys, lungs, and other vital organs are also occluded. Angioplasty or CABG can clean out only a few arteries supplying the heart.

References

  1. Cranton, Elmer. Bypassing Bypass (2d Ed). Medex Publishers, Trout Dale, VA 24378-0044, 1992.
  2. EDTA Chelation: A Misunderstood Therapy for Atherosclerosis and Other Diseases, by Ward Dean, MD, August 1997, VRP Library.
  3. Harman, D. The biologic clock: The mitochondria? J Am Geriatr Soc, 1972; 20: 145-147.
  4. These papers, The correlation between EDTA Chelation Therapy and improvement in cardiovascular function: A Meta-Analysis, and EDTA Chelation Treatment for vascular disease: A Meta-Analysis using unpublished data, both by L.T. Chappell and J.P. Stahl, were published in the Journal of Advancement in Medicine in 1993 and 1994.
  5. Hancke, C. and Flytlie, K, Benefits of EDTA Chelation Therapy in Arteriosclerosis: A retrospective study of 470 patients, Journal of Advancement in Medicine, 1993; 6:3, 161-171.
  6. Olszewer E, Carter JP. EDTA chelation therapy in chronic degenerative disease. Med Hypotheses. 1988; 27:41-49.
  7. Olszewer E, Sabbag FC, Carter JP. A pilot double-blind study of sodium-magnesium EDTA in peripheral vascular disease. J Natl Med Assoc 1990; 82:173-174.
  8. Hancke C, Flytie K. Benefits of EDTA chelation therapy on arteriosclerosis. J Adv Med. 1993; 6:161-172.
  9. Edmunds LH, Stephenson LW, Edie RN, Ratcliffe MB. Open-heart surgery in octogenarians. N Engl J Med. 1988; 319:131-136.
  10. CASS Principal Investigators and the Associates. Coronary artery surgery study (CASS): a randomized trial of coronary artery bypass surgery: Survival data. Circulation. 1983; 68:939-950.
  11. CASS Principal Investigators and the Associates. Myocardial infarction and mortality in the Coronary Artery Surgery Study randomized trial. N Engl J Med. 1984; 310:750-758.
  12. Chappell LT, Janson M. EDTA chelation therapy in the treatment of vascular disease. J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1996;10:78-86.
  13. Cashin WL, Sanmarco ME, Nessim SA, Blankenhorn DH. Accelerated progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels with minimal lesions that are bypassed. N Engl J Med. 1984; 311:824-828.
  14. Arom KV, Cohen DE, Strobl FT. Effect of intraoperative intervention on neurological outcome based on electroencephalographic monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass. Ann Thorac Surg. 1988; 48:476-483.
  15. Olszewer E, Carter JP. EDTA chelation therapy in chronic degenerative disease. Med Hypotheses. 1988;27:41-49.

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